sea anemones text index | photo index
Phylum Cnidaria > Class Anthozoa > Subclass Zoantharia/Hexacorallia > Order Actiniaria
Striped bead anemone
awaiting identification*
updated Oct 2016
Where seen? This small sea anemone is commonly seen especially on our Northern shores. Even relatively "beat up" shores with few other lifeforms will have these sea anemones. It is often found in small clusters of a few individuals. It settles wedged in crevices on rocks, on hard surfaces such as jetty pilings, boulders, rocks, and on small stones on the shores. When exposed at low tide, it tucks its tentacles into its body and looks like a blob.

Features: Diameter with tentacles 2-3cm. Many semi-transparent tentacles that taper to a pointed tip. On the upper side of the tentacles, there is a pattern of white bars across a pair of dark parallel lines that run the length of each tentacle. The oral disk may be plain or have a pattern of stripes radiating out from the mouth.

It is larger than the banded bead anemone, and found in clusters of fewer individuals.


Pasir Ris Park, Dec 08


Pasir Ris Park, Dec 08

Pasir Ris Park, Jan 09

Pasir Ris Park, Jan 09

Pasir Ris Park, Jan 09

*Species are difficult to positively identify without close examination.
On this website, they are grouped by external features for convenience of display.

Striped bead anemones on Singapore shores

Photos of Striped bead anemones for free download from wildsingapore flickr

Distribution in Singapore on this wildsingapore flickr map


Pulau Ubin OBS, Jan 16

Photo shared by Marcus Ng on facebook.

Pulau Ubin OBS, Jan 16

Photo shared by Loh Kok Sheng on facebook.

Chek Jawa, Jul 16

Photo shared by Marcus Ng on flickr.


Seingat-Kias, Apr 11
Photo shared by Loh Kok Sheng on flickr.

Kusu Island, Aug 07

Photo shared by Loh Kok Sheng on his blog.
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