brown seaweeds text index | photo index
Seaweeds > Division Phaeophyta
Y-branch brown seaweed
Dictyota sp.*
Family Dictyotaceae
updated Jan 13

Where seen? This flat strap-like brown seaweed is sometimes seen on many of our shores, often anchored in bare sand.

Features: A bunch of several to many strap-like blades about 1-2cm wide and 10-15cm long, branching on one plane forming Y-shapes with rounded or squarish tips. The seaweed does not have a prominent midrib or vein. Usually a plain translucent brown. In some, the entire clump comprises a few long strands. In others, there are many short strands forming a dense clump.

According to AlgaeBase, there are more than 70 current Dictyota species.

Human uses: Strap brown seaweed is eaten by people and used as animal feed, medicine for its antibacterial properties. Dictyota dichotoma is also used to make beer, frozen food, fruit juices, ice cream, jellies, in meat and flavour sauces, milk shakes, pastries and salad dressings. Extracts from it are also used in industry as emulsifiers, gelling agents, stabilisers.

Labrador, Apr 05

Berlayar Creek, Feb 12

Tuas, Jun 05

Sentosa, Jun 07


Pulau Sekudu, Aug 06

Changi, Jul 06

Changi, Apr 05

*Seaweed species are difficult to positively identify without microscopic examination.
On this website, they are grouped by external features for convenience of display.

Y-branch brown seaweed on Singapore shores

Photos of Y-branch brown seaweed for free download from wildsingapore flickr


Distribution in Singapore on this wildsingapore flickr map

Dictyota species recorded for Singapore
Pham, M. N., H. T. W. Tan, S. Mitrovic & H. H. T. Yeo, 2011. A Checklist of the Algae of Singapore.

  Dictyota adnata
Dictyota bartayresiana
Dictyota ciliolata
Dictyota crispata
Dictyota dichotoma
(Bluish y-branch brown seaweed)
Dictyota dichotoma var. intricata
Dictyota hauckiana
Dictyota lata

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References

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