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Phylum Mollusca > Class Bivalvia > Family Limidae
Swimming file clam
Limaria sp.
Family Limidae
updated May 2020

Where seen? This intriguing animals with fleshy tentacles are sometimes seen near living reefs, under corals and stones.

Features: 4- 6cm. The two-part shell is thin, fine ridges, usually white or yellowish. The shell can't close completely and there is a permanently open gape. Tentacles very long, usually reddish with fine bars. Tentacles can't be retracted completely in the shell.
These tentacles are sticky and can break off if the animal is distressed. The animal is quite active and can swim by 'clapping' its valves.

Terumbu Pempang Tengah, Jul 12

Terumbu Pempang Tengah, Jul 12

Wedged in a crevice.
St John's Island, Oct 20

Photo shared by James Koh on flickr.

St John's Island, Oct 20
Photo shared by James Koh on flickr.

Swimming file clams on Singapore shores
On wildsingapore flickr

Other sightings on Singapore shores


Sentosa Tg Rimau, Nov 20
Photo shared by Vincent Choo on facebook.

Sentosa Serapong, Dec 20
Photo shared by Vincent Choo on facebook.
 


Lazarus Island, Nov 20
Photo shared by Vincent Choo on facebook.

Kusu Island, Jul 20
Photo shared by Richard Kuah on facebook.

Big Sisters Island, Feb 21
Photo shared by Joleen Chan on facebook.


Terumbu Semakau, Apr 21
Photo shared by Jianlin Liu on facebook.

Cyrene Reef, Apr 21
Photo shared by Vincent Choo on facebook.


Terumbu Pempang Laut, Jul 20
Photo shared by Vincent Choo on facebook.


Terumbu Pempang Tengah, May 11
Photo shared by Ivan Kwan on flickr.

Terumbu Pempang Tengah, May 21
Photo shared by Vincent Choo on facebook.

Terumbu Pempang Kecil, Jan 15
Photo shared by Marcus Ng on facebook.

Terumbu Pempang Laut, Jul 20

Acknowlegement
With grateful thanks to Tan Siong Kiat of the Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research for identifying this clam.

Links

References

  • Tan Siong Kiat and Henrietta P. M. Woo, 2010 Preliminary Checklist of The Molluscs of Singapore (pdf), Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, National University of Singapore.
  • Tan, K. S. & L. M. Chou, 2000. A Guide to the Common Seashells of Singapore. Singapore Science Centre. 160 pp.
  • Abbott, R. Tucker, 1991. Seashells of South East Asia. Graham Brash, Singapore. 145 pp.
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