shelled snails text index | photo index
Phylum Mollusca > Class Gastropoda
Frog snail
Bufonaria sp.
Family Bursidae
updated Oct 2016
Where seen? Although the shells are often seen (usually occupied by hermit crabs), living snails are rarely seen. Usually at the lowest tides near seagrass meadows on our Northern and Eastern shores. Apparently, the name is due to the warty texture of the shell.

Features: 4-6cm. Shell thick, conical with spirals of many regular bumps and blunt spines. There is a short tubular tip on the shell for the siphon. Ooperculum thin and flexible, made of a horn-like material. Body pale, with a long muscular foot, short tentacles with a black band at the tips.


The Common frog snail (Bufonaria rana) is about 7.5cm long, up to 9cm and found on mud or muddy-sand bottoms.

What does it eat? Some species appear appear to feed on tube worms. These have an extendible proboscis and large salivary glands, that are probably used to anaesthetize the worms in their tubes; the worms are then sucked out and swallowed whole.

East Coast, Nov 08

Muscular foot with operculum.

East Coast, Jul 09
Photo shared by Loh Kok Sheng on his blog.

Frog snails on Singapore shores

Photos of Frog snails for free download from wildsingapore flickr

Distribution in Singapore on this wildsingapore flickr map

Family Bursidae recorded for Singapore
from Tan Siong Kiat and Henrietta P. M. Woo, 2010 Preliminary Checklist of The Molluscs of Singapore.

  Family Bursidae
  Bufonaria perelegans
Bufonaria rana=Bursa rana

Links

References

  • Tan Siong Kiat and Henrietta P. M. Woo, 2010 Preliminary Checklist of The Molluscs of Singapore (pdf), Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, National University of Singapore.
  • Tan, K. S. & L. M. Chou, 2000. A Guide to the Common Seashells of Singapore. Singapore Science Centre. 160 pp.
  • Wee Y.C. and Peter K. L. Ng. 1994. A First Look at Biodiversity in Singapore. National Council on the Environment. 163pp.
  • Abbott, R. Tucker, 1991. Seashells of South East Asia. Graham Brash, Singapore. 145 pp.
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